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Cleveland landscape plants (Native Perennials Resilient flowers H-Z) .

Published on 31 August 2021 at 21:19

Goldenrod (Solidago)

Goldenrod is a tough, fall flowering plant that can brighten up your garden. It doesn't spread aggressively and its floral display comes in the autumn when other plants have passed their prime. Ohio Goldenrod is great for flower borders as it blooms while many flowers are about to die or wilt away during winter months - one of few deciduous perennials with golden yellow colorings! Its pollen causes hay fever allergies but not necessarily because ragweed releases more pollen than golden rod does; rather, this weed's inconspicuity confuses people into thinking they have an allergy caused by oak tree leaves instead of getting diagnosed properly before too much time has gone by without relief from symptoms - Ragweed may be present throughout summer until early October

 

Great Blue Lobelia (Lobelia siphilitica)

The Great Blue Lobelia is a striking plant that grows in wet and moist locations. Its vibrant blue color attracts pollinators such as bumblebees, hummingbirds, and large butterflies to its nectar-filled flowers which typically bloom at the end of summer.

 

Joe Pye Weed (Eupatorium maculatum)

Joe Pye weed is a stunning plant which attracts butterflies with its large, beautiful flowers. It blooms from July to September and typically has five or seven florets per flower cluster. The flowers of Joe Pye Weed are often considered weeds by people who have space constraints but when planted in groups can provide spectacular color for months on end!

 

Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris)

If you're looking for a plant that will attract butterflies and hummingbirds to your garden, look no further than the marsh marigold. These yellow buttercup-like blossoms spring up from April until June in moist woodlands or bogs - but they don't require much care! You can grow these plants near ponds by digging them into the ground so their roots are completely submerged when it rains. Simply water them every now and then with rainwater if needed; otherwise, this easygoing flower requires little attention at all!

 

Obedient Plant (Physostegia virginiana)

The obedient plant is a rare find in the natural world. It produces tall, spiky flowers that are sure to attract any bee or hummingbird who happens by it's tubular blooms from June - September! The only attention this plant requires is occasional watering and light fertilization once every month just so you can keep your garden looking beautiful year after year as these plants spread rapidly on their own when given room to grow!

 

Ox-Eye Sunflower (Helianthus occidentalis)

These sunflowers are a short and sweet plant, blooming from mid-summer to fall. They attract butterflies, songbirds and other migratory birds with their bright yellow petals that line up in rows like soldiers on parade. The false sunflower is so easy to grow because it requires minimal care: just planting them will do the trick! Deadheading these plants regularly will encourage more flowers or stop re-seeding altogether - whichever you prefer!

 

Smooth Penstemon (Penstemon digitalis)

Smooth Penstemons are one of the most recognizable flowers in North America. They bloom during early summer, attracting bees, butterflies and hummingbirds with their white or light-pink tinted tubular blossoms that grow on branching hollow stalks. Penstemon is sometimes commonly called beard tongue because the sterile stamen has a tuft of small hairs.

 

Swamp Milkweed (Asclepias incarnata)

The Swamp milkweed flowers are a beautiful pink color that contrasts with the green leaves. These plants attract many different types of pollinators and can often be seen as food for caterpillars in their cocoons during earlier stages. The flower also provides nectar to help provide energy, which is important when trying to find good places for them to lay eggs later on - they need all of the strength they can get!

 

 

 

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Turtlehead (Chelone glabra)

Turtlehead is an attractive flower with snapdragon-like flowers that bloom from July into September. The foliage is considered both food (for butterflies) and breeding grounds (hummingbirds). It can be found along damp ground near waterways or stream banks as well as lakesides but it does require minimal care: all you have to do when watering these plants regularly spritz them once per month or so during periods of drought.

 

White Wood Aster (Aster divaricatus)

White wood aster is a delicate, airy plant that blooms in late summer and early fall. The small white flowers fade to red at the top of dark green stems with yellow centers that are attractive for butterflies seeking nectar. White Wood Aster has an ability to grow and flower well in dry shade but also does much better when partially shaded by trees where it gets about 3 hours or so of sunlight each day during its peak flowering season from September through November

 

Wild Bergamont (Monarda fistulosa)

The wild bergamot is a beautiful flower with gorgeous lavender petals and nectar that attracts bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds. Growing in most of North America the wild bergamot has been used for its medicinal purposes among Native Americans including poultices for boils or even lacerations as well as tea infusions to treat headaches, indigestion or colds/flu!

 

Wild Geranium (Geranium maculatum)

Wild Geraniums are known to grow in a variety of colors with most blooming from April through May. These beautiful flowers attract not only beneficial insects and songbirds, but migratory birds as well. While the plant may appear delicate at first glance, it is actually an exceptionally hardy species that will thrive even when exposed to harsh conditions such as heavy rains or intense heat waves!

 

Wild Lupine (Lupinis perennis)

Wild Geraniums are known to grow in a variety of colors with most blooming from April through May. These beautiful flowers attract not only beneficial insects and songbirds, but migratory birds as well. While the plant may appear delicate at first glance, it is actually an exceptionally hardy species that will thrive even when exposed to harsh conditions such as heavy rains or intense heat waves!

 

Wood Poppy (Stylophorum diphyllum)

Wood Poppies are a type of flower that is known for its large, poppy-like yellow flowers. They bloom in March and April before being replaced by ovoid seed capsules. The seeds can be collected from the plants to make them into food or jewelry!

 

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources provides an extensive list. More information is available at the Native Plant Society of Northeast Ohio,  the Ohio Landscape Association and plantnative.org.


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